rect
American Patriot Party, State Elections Division Candidates Oregon State
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American Patriot Party, State Elections Division Candidates Oregon State
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American Patriot Party, State Elections Division Candidates Oregon State
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ThePatriotsDraftPicks.jpg 

 

 

 

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AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF THE INDEPENDENT AND UNITED STATES:

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF ALABAMA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF ALASKA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF AMERICAN SAMOA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF ARIZONA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF ARKANSAS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF CALIFORNIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF COLORADO

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF CONNECTICUT

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF DELAWARE

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF FLORIDA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF GEORGIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF GUAM

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF HAWAII

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF IDAHO

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF ILLINOIS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF INDIANA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF IOWA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF KANSAS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF KENTUCKY

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF LOUISIANA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MAINE

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MARSHALL ISLANDS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MARYLAND

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MASSACHUSETTS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MICHIGAN

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MINNESOTA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MISSISSIPPI

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MISSOURI

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF MONTANA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NEBRASKA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NEVADA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NEW JERSEY

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NEW MEXICO

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NEW YORK

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NORTH DAKOTA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF OHIO

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF OKLAHOMA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF OREGON

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF PALAU

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF PENNSYLVANIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF PUERTO RICO

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF RHODE ISLAND

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF SOUTH DAKOTA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF TENNESSEE

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF TEXAS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF UTAH

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF VERMONT

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF VIRGIN ISLANDS

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF VIRGINIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF WASHINGTON

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF WEST VIRGINIA

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF WISCONSIN

AMERICAN PATRIOT PARTY OF WYOMING

 

ThePatriotsDraftChoice.jpg 


Oregon Patriot Party.COM
American Patriot Party.US

 

PatriotRevolution.jpg 



APP National
Richard Taylor

 

PatriotsFacebook.jpg 

 

APP National

 

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APPNational
AMPatriotParty
RichardTaylorAPP
 

PatriotsYouTube.jpg 

 

APP YouTube



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Ustream



AmericanRevolution.jpg



APP Archives Wayback Machine
Campaign for Liberty




DeclarationIndependence.jpg


APP Daily Paul
APP Campaign for Liberty
APP Freedom Works
APP Topix


Other Liberty Active Links


John Birch Society org
Ben Swann - Reality Report
Daily Paul
Infowars
C4L Facebook
C4L Twitter
C4L Feeds
Freedomworks

International Liberty Active Links

UKIP -
United Kingdom Independence Party

Daniel Hannon - MEP

Daniel Hannon - Twitter:

Nigel Farage - MEP

Nigel Farage - Web Site

Nigel Farage - Twitter:   

  Indirect Links


WIKIPEDIA - Patriot_Party

WIKIPEDIA - Political_Parties Oregon

WIKIPEDIA - List_of_ Political_Parties_in_the_Unit ed_St ates

WIKIPEDIA - Patriot_ Party

WIKIPEDIA Patriot

WIKIPEDIA - Political _colour

WIKIPEDIA -  Constitution_Party

WIKIPEDIA -  Conservative_political_partie s

WIKIPEDIA - Conservative_Political_Partie s

WIKIPEDIA Politics_ of_the_United_States

WIKIPEDIA - American_Patriot_Party

Google 1
Sons of Liberty:
SOL #1
SOL #2
 
  APP Opposition Groups:

  Southern Poverty Law Center - The Center for Propaganda for Socialism in America which opposes CITIZEN MILITIAS

  This is in Opposition of the Constitution as it was written and against the principles of Common Law... A REVERSE HATE GROUP:

LINKS:

SPL #1
SPL #2 patriot-movememnt
SPL #3 entelligence-files
SPL #4
     This group say they want to protect  on one hand - but then allow the deviant of society to brain wash and then misuse others or each other outside the Laws of Nature; Allowing for the existence of Voluntary Slavery  and Slavery - Through the relinquishment of inalienable rights.

This Group, Communist / Socialist in nature,  places a form of "Subjugated Peace" under a central national government;  Instead of abiding by the True Principles of Freedom established in small well represented and independent republics;

 See John Locke with regard to such a "peace"  word search LAMB on his Second Treatise on Civil Government.

They are a proponent of reverse hate; and are a proponent for the use of National Federal force, cumulated by government "laws" which have been created without authority  - i.e. under the
PRETENSE OF AUTHORITY.

See Virginia Resolution 1798, James Madison, denouncing when the government makes itself, and not the Constitution the Measure of its powers.

 
  APP NETWORKED LINKS
  
YouTube
Google Search
Yahoo Search
Bing Search
Netscape Search
Klare Taylor Publishers
Pacific Westcom
Green Springs
Landship
ProToonerz
The Comics Section

 
 
NASA
WEATHER.GOV
NOAA RADAR 1
RADAR NW
RADAR 3
 
 

American Patriot Party

Inalienable Rights, States Rights, Local Control.

Great Resources for Founders Documents


Constitution.Org
http://www.constitution.org

University of Chicago, Founders Constitution
http://press-pubs.uchicago.e du/founders/



States State Elections Division, Secretary of State Directory and State Constitutions:


ALABAMA

Office of Secretary of State
PO Box 5616
Montgomery, AL 36106
(334) 242-7559 FAX (334) 242-2444
http://www.sos.state.al.us/ele ction/index.cfm

Alabama Elections and Voting
http://www.alabama.gov/port al/government/voting.jsp

Alabama Elections Division
http://www.alabamainteractiv e.org/  http://www.sos.state.al.us/ele ction/index.cfm

Alabama State Constitution
http://www.legislature.state.al .us/CodeOfAlabama/Constitu tion/

ALASKA

Alaska Elections Division and Voting:
http://www.state.ak.us/local/a kdir1.shtml

 PO Box 110017
Juneau, AK 99811-0017
(907) 465-4611 FAX (907) 465-3203

Alaska State Government Directory
http://www.state.ak.us

Alaska State Constitution
http://ltgov.state.ak.us/constit ution.php


AMERICAN SAMOA

Election Officer
PO Box 3790
Pago Pago AS 96799
011-684-633-2522 FAX 011-684-633-7116
http://www.electionoffice.as
 

ARIZONA

Secretary of State's Office
1700 W. Washington, 7th Floor
Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 542-8683 FAX (602) 542-6172
http://www.azsos.gov

Arizona Elections Division and Voting
http://www.azsos.gov/election

Arizona State Constitution
http://www.azleg.gov/Constitu tion.asp


ARKANSAS

Arkansas Secretary of State
http://www.sos.arkansas.gov

Secretary of State, State Capitol, Room 026
Little Rock, AR 72201
(501) 682-3419 FAX (501) 682-3408

Arkansas Constitution
http://www.sos.arkansas.gov/ ar-constitution/arconst/arcon st.htm


CALIFORNIA

California Secretary of State
http://www.sos.arkansas.gov/ ar-constitution/arconst/arcon st.htm

California State Elections Division and Voting
http://www.ss.ca.gov/election s/elections.htm

 1500 11th St., 5th Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 657-2166 FAX (916) 653-3214

California State Constitution
http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/con st-toc.html


COLORADO

Colorado Secretary of State
http://www.sos.state.co.us

Colorado State Elections Division and Voting
http://www.elections.colorado .gov

1700 Broadway, Suite 270
Denver, CO 80290
(303) 894-2680 FAX (303) 869-7731

Colorado State Constitution
http://www.colorado.gov/dpa/ doit/archives/constitution/ind ex.html


CONNECTICUT

Connecticut Secretary of State
http://www.sots.ct.gov

Connecticut State Elections Division and Voting
http://www.sots.ct.gov/Electio nsServices/ElectionIndex.ht ml

30 Trinity Street
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 509-6100 FAX (860) 509-6127

Connecticut State Constitution
http://www.sots.ct.gov/Regist erManual/SectionI/ctconstit.ht m


DELAWARE

Delaware Secretary of State
http://www.state.de.us/sos

Delaware State Elections Division
http://www.state.de.us/electio n

 111 S. West Street, Suite 10
Dover, DE 19904
(302) 739-4277 FAX (302) 739- 6794

Delaware Elections Directory
http://delaware.gov/egov/port al.nsf

Delaware State Constitution
http://www.state.de.us/facts/c onstit/de_const.htm


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA - WASHINGTON DC

District of Columbia Secretary of State
http://www.os.dc.gov/os/site

District of Columbia Board of Ethics and Elections
http://www.dcboee.org

441 Fourth St., NW, Suite 250N
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 727-2525 FAX (202) 347-2648

District of Columbia Home Rule Act
http://www.abfa.com/ogc/hrac t.htm


FLORIDA

Florida Department of State
http://www.dos.state.fl.us

Florida State Elections Division
http://election.dos.state.fl.us/i ndex.html

Room 316, R.A. Gray Building
500 S. Bronough Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250
(850) 245-6200 FAX (850) 245-6217

Florida State Constitution
http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Stat utes/index.cfm


GEORGIA

Georgia Secretary of State
http://www.georgia.gov

Georgia State Elections Division
 Suite 1104, West Tower
2 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, SE
Atlanta, GA 30334-1505
(404) 656-2871 FAX (404) 651-9536
http://www.sos.state.ga.us/el ections

Georgia State Constitution
http://www.sos.state.ga.us/E LECTIONS/constitution.htm


GUAM

Guam Secretary of State
Governor of Guam
http://guamgovernor.net

Guam Election Commission
PO Box BG
Agana, GU 96910
(671) 477-9791 Fax: (671) 477-1895
http://www.guamelection.org

Attorney General of Guam
The Organic Act of Guam
http://www.guamattorneygen eral.com


HAWAII

Office of Elections
802 Lehua Avenue
Pearl City, HI 96782
(808) 453-8683 FAX (808) 453-6006
http://www.state.hi.us/electio ns


IDAHO

Idaho Secretary of State
700 W. Jefferson, Rm. 203
Boise, ID 83720-0080
(208) 334-2300 FAX (208) 334-2282
http://www.idsos.state.id.us/e lect/eleindex.htm


ILLINOIS

State Board of Elections
1020 S. Spring St., PO Box 4187
Springfield, IL 62708
(217) 782-4141 FAX (217) 782-5959
http://www.elections.il.gov


INDIANA

Indiana Election Division
302 W. Washington, Rm E204
Indianapolis, IN 46204
(317) 232-3939 FAX (317) 233-6793
http://www.in.gov/sos/electio ns


IOWA

Iowa Secretary of State Office
321 E. 12th Street
Des Moines, IA 50319
(515) 281-5823 FAX (515) 281-7142
http://www.sos.state.ia.us


KANSAS

Deputy Assistant for Elections
120 SW 10th Ave.
First Floor, Memorial Hall
Topeka, Kansas 66612-1594
(785) 296-4561 FAX (785) 291-3051
http://www.kssos.org


KENTUCKY

State Board of Elections
140 Walnut St.,
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 573-7100 FAX (502) 573-4369
http://www.kysos.com/index/ main/elecdiv.asp


LOUISIANA

Commissioner of Elections
8549 United Plaza Blvd.
P.O. Box 94125
Baton Rouge, LA 70802-9125
(225) 922-0900 FAX (225) 922-0945
http://www.sec.state.la.us/ele ctions/elections-index.htm


MAINE

Secretary of State
101 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0101
(207) 624-7734 FAX (207) 287-5428

Elections Director
101 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0101
(207) 624-7734 FAX (207) 287-5428
http://www.maine.gov/sos/ce c/elec


MARYLAND

State Board of Elections
P.O. Box 6486
Annapolis, Maryland 21401-0486
(410) 269-2840 FAX (410) 974-2019
http://www.elections.state.md .us


MASSACHUSETTS

Election Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1705
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 727-2828 FAX (617) 742-3238
http://www.state.ma.us/sec/el e/eleidx.htm


MICHIGAN

Bureau of Elections
Treasury Building, 1st Floor
430 W. Allegan Street
Lansing, MI 48918
(517) 373-2540 FAX (517) 241-2784
 
http://www.michigan.gov/sos/ 0,1606,7-127-1633---,00.htm l


MINNESOTA

Secretary of State
180 State Office Building
100 Rev. Martin Luther King Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55155
(651) 215-1440 FAX (651) 296-9073
http://www.sos.state.mn.us/e lection/index.html

MISSISSIPPI

Secretary of State for Elections
PO Box 136, 401 Mississippi St.
Jackson, MS 39205
(601) 359-6368 FAX (601) 359-1499
http://www.sos.state.ms.us


MISSOURI

Missouri Secretary of State's Office
PO Box 1767
Jefferson City, MO 65102
(573) 751-2301 FAX (573) 526-3242
http://www.sos.mo.gov/electi ons


MONTANA

Deputy for Elections
PO Box 202801
Helena, MT 59620
(406) 444-5376 FAX (406) 444-2023
http://sos.state.mt.us/css/ind ex.asp


NEBRASKA

Secretary of State
State Capitol, Suite 2300
Lincoln, NE 68502
(402) 471-3229 FAX (402) 471-3237
http://www.nol.org/home/SOS /Elections/election.htm


NEVADA

Nevada Secretary of State
101 North Carson St., Suite 3
Carson City, NV 89701
(775) 684-5793 FAX (775) 684-5718
http://sos.state.nv.us


NEW HAMPSHIRE

Secretary of State
State House, Room 204
Concord, NH 03301-4989
(603) 271-5335 FAX (603) 271-7933
http://www.sos.nh.gov/electio nsnew.htm


NEW JERSEY

Division of Elections
Office of the Attorney General
44 South Clinton Avenue, 7th Floor
P.O Box 304
Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0304
(609) 292-3760 FAX (609)777-1280
http://www.njelections.org


NEW MEXICO

Director of Elections
State Capitol Annex
325 Don Gaspar, Suite 300
Santa Fe, NM 87503
(505) 827-3620 FAX (505) 827-8403
http://www.sos.state.nm.us/M ain/Elections/ElectionInfo.ht m


NEW YORK

State Board of Elections
40 Steuben Street
Albany, NY 12207
(518) 474-8100 (518) 486-4068
http://www.elections.state.ny. us


NORTH CAROLINA

State Board of Elections
PO Box 27255
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611-7255
(919) 733-7173 FAX (919) 715-0135
http://www.sboe.state.nc.us


NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota Secretary of State
600 E Boulevard Ave Dept 108
Bismarck, ND 58505-0500
(701) 328-3660 FAX (701) 328-2992
http://www.nd.gov/sos


OHIO

Ohio Secretary of State
Director of Elections
180 E. Broad St., 15th Floor
Columbus, OH 43215
(614) 466-2585 FAX (614) 752-4360
http://www.sos.state.oh.us/s os/elections/index.html


OKLAHOMA

State Election Board
Room 6, State Capitol
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
(405) 521-2391 FAX (405) 521-6457
http://www.state.ok.us/~electi ons


OREGON

Director of Elections
Office of the Secretary of State
141 State Capitol
Salem, OR 97310
(503) 986-1518 FAX (503) 373-7414
http://www.sos.state.or.us/el ections/elechp.htm


PENNSYLVANIA

Commissioner of Elections
210 North Office Building
Harrisburg, PA 17120
(717) 787-5280 FAX (717) 705-0721
http://www.dos.state.pa.us/bc el/site/default.asp


PUERTO RICO

Puerto Rico State Election Commission
P.O. Box 195552
San Juan, PR 00919-5552
(787) 777-8675 FAX (787) 296-0173
http://www.ceepur.org


RHODE ISLAND

State Board of Elections
50 Branch Avenue
Providence, RI 02904
(401) 222-2345 FAX (401) 222-3135
http://www.elections.state.ri.u s


SOUTH CAROLINA

State Election Commission
Post Office Box 5987
Columbia, SC 29250
(803) 734-9060 FAX (803) 734-9366
http://www.state.sc.us/scsec


SOUTH DAKOTA

Election Supervisor
500 East Capitol Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 773-3537 FAX (605) 773-6580
http://www.state.sd.us/sos


TENNESSEE

Tennessee Secretary of State's Office
312 Eighth Avenue North
9th Floor
Nashville, TN 37243
(615) 741-7956 FAX (615) 741-1278
http://www.state.tn.us/sos/ele ction.htm


TEXAS

Director of Elections, General Law Division
Secretary of State/ Election Division
Post Office Box 12060
Austin, TX 78711-2060
(512) 463-5650 FAX (512) 475-2811
http://www.sos.state.tx.us/ele ctions/index.shtml


UTAH

Utah State Elections Office
Utah State Capitol Complex
East Office Building, Suite E325
P.O. Box 142325
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2325
(801) 538-1041 FAX (801) 538-1133
http://www.elections.utah.gov


VERMONT

Director of Elections and Campaign Finance
Office of Secretary of State
26 Terrace Street, Drawer 09
Montpelier, Vermont 05609-1101
(802) 828-2304 FAX (802) 828-5171
http://www.sec.state.vt.us/#el ections


VIRGIN ISLANDS

Supervisor of Elections
Election System of the Virgin Islands
Post Office Box 1499, Kingshill
St. Croix, VI 00851-1499
(340) 773-1021 FAX (340) 773-4523
http://www.vivote.gov


VIRGINIA

Secretary of State, Board of Elections
200 North 9th Street, Room 101
Richmond, VA 23219
(800) 552-9745 or (804) 864-8901 FAX (804) 371-0194
http://www.sbe.state.va.us


WASHINGTON

Office of Secretary of State, Elections Division
Legislative Building, P.O. Box 40220
Olympia, WA 98504-0220
(360) 902-4180 FAX (360) 586-5629
http://www.vote.wa.gov


WEST VIRGINIA

Manager of Elections
West Virginia Secretary of State Elections Division
1900 Kanawha Blvd E.
State Capitol Room 157-K
Charleston, WV 25305-0770
(304) 558-6000 FAX (304) 558-0900
http://www.wvsos.com


WISCONSIN

Wisconsin State Elections Board
17 West Main Street, Suite 310
Madison, WI 53703-3305
P.O. Box 2973
Madison, WI 53701-2973
(608) 266-8087 FAX (608) 267-0500
http://elections.state.wi.us


WYOMING

Wyoming Secretary of State's Office
200 W. 24th Street
Cheyenne, WY 82002-0020
(307) 777-3573 FAX (307) 777-7640
http://soswy.state.wy.us/electi on/election.htm


Federal Government Links:

Official US Department of State
http://www.state.gov/

University of Chicago, Founders Constitution
http://press-pubs.uchicago.e du/founders/

Constitution.Org
http://www.constitution.org


Ron Paul
http://www.pacificwestcom.co m/ronpaul





American Patriot.

Home of the American Patriots of the American Patriot Party.
 

 

American Patriot Party
with regard to
Distant Legislatures

 

 

Distance was, is, and will always be, an important factor with regard to freedom.

The issue of distant legislatures "3000 milesdistant" at that time resembles that of the distance between Washington and California, not only in distance, but in the amount of real concern anyone 50, 100, 1000 or 3000 miles distant can ever possibly have in any community which issues involve that within 1, 5 or 10 miles of their location.

And as in 1772 was done against the Colonists, the federal government to tax and regulate us, must, as was done by the British government, in effect must also
"bribe" against our interests;

Instead of local county governments championing the interests of the local citizens they are suppose to represent, they find themselves clamoring for federal or state dollars that should have never left the county, so that they may regain the money through
"bribes" of compliance of programs from the federal government and state capitol governments; State governments which are also distant to local concerns, and who also allow themselves to be bribed by national and international interests.


------------------------------------

Rights of the Colonists 1772

Samuel Adams:
"...Now what liberty can there be, where propertyis taken away without ""consent"? Can it be said with any colour of truth and Justice, that this Continent ofthree thousand miles in length, and a breadth as yet unexplored, in which however, its supposed, there are five millions of people, has the least voice, vote or influence in the decisions of the British Parliament?

Have they, all together, any more right or power to return a single member to that house of commons, who have not inadvertently, but deliberately assumed a power to dispose of their lives,
8 Liberties and properties, than to choose an Emperor of China!

Had the Colonists a right to return members to the British parliament, it would only be hurtful; as from their local situation and circumstances it is
"impossible" they should be evertruly and properly represented there.

The inhabitants of this country in all probability in a few years will be more numerous, than those of Great Britain and Ireland together; yet it is
absurdly expected[Volume 5, Page 397] by the promoters of the present measures, that these, with their posterity to all generations, should be easy while their property, shall be disposed of by a house of commons at three thousand miles "distant" from them;

and whocannot be supposed to have the least care or concern for their real interest:Who have not only no natural care for their interest,

"but must be in effect>>> "bribed"against it"; as every "burden" they lay on the colonists is so much saved or gained to themselves. ..."


How clearly we now find ourselves in the same position as those founders.

The federal government forcing taxation, skimming what it wishes to support its bloated dependent bureaucracy, then offering some of it back to the states in government programs or highway funds if the state complies with its policies and national mandates;

Clearly using "
Bribery" of the taxpayers own money already collected from them to force upon them compliance to those federal mandates.

Far better, would be for the states to take control of the highways and never let the money out of the state.

The interests of a community is only able to be properly represented by those who actually have an actual physical interest in the local community.

A condition that should stop all national and state impositions at the county border to be legislated by each local community as to its merit with regard to their community and in regard to retained rights and constitutional merit.

Counties
that have land masses near or greater than the smallest states that established the Constitution; for which, should have no less concern as a state to their representation and powers of legislation in those lands they encompass;

Counties
should have no less the power and control by the people through their own local county legislatures with regard to their local communities property and issues within those territories.

This is the local  "Vicintity" described by the founders to adiquately establish true representation to a commonwealths interests and needs.

This is opposed to a local county or community's present conditions which is often adversely and arbitrarily dictated in areas of  property, building, zoning, environment and others by distant state and federal mandates not dictated by the best interests or choices of the local citizens.

That such control should be encompassed  by those most effected no greater area of 5 miles, or 1 mile,  which ever is least within any county, decided in county courts;

Thereby the term of "public opinion" being correctly defined as "those most effected" and "actually effected" by any issue within that area, setting preference and precedence of opinion to those actually living within this area.

The present condition is that where businesses, buildings, towns and cities could be created by local residences, the determination is by legislative assemblies that are distant from that local area, limiting such development by arbitrary administrative decision or legislated "required population", of which bar is constantly being lifted beyond the capability of the local community to dictate; All to be decided by distant legislatures whose concerns are not of the community, but control of those communities by those distant legislatures.

This we intend to change.




Constitutional Debates MONDAY, June 16, 1788.[1] [Elliot misprinted this as Monday, June 14, 1788.]



Patrick Henry:
"What says our bill of rights? "that excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." Are you not, therefore, now calling on those gentlemen who are to compose Congress, to prescribe trials and define punishments without this control? Will they find sentiments there similar to this bill of rights?
You let them loose; you do more you depart from the genius of your country.

That paper tells you that the trial of crimes shall be by jury, and held in the state where the crime shall have been committed. Under this extensive provision, they may proceed in a manner extremely dangerous to liberty: a person accused may be carried fromone extremity of the statute to another, and be tried, not by an impartial jury of the "vicinage", acquaintedwith his character and the circumstances of the fact, but by a juryunacquainted with both, and who may be biased against him.

Is not this sufficient to alarm men?

How different is this from the immemorial practice of your British ancestors, and your own!

I need not tell you that, by the common law, a number of hundreds were required on a jury, and that afterwards it was sufficient if the jurors came from the
same county. With "less" than this the people of England have never been satisfied. That paper (the Constitution) "ought" to have declared the"common lawin force."




Here we have Patrick Henry describing the inconsistencies of the Constitution and the danger that could very well arise from it.

Dangers which have and are arising every day as administrative law, federal and state policies attack the liberties through arbitrary interoffice policies and decisions from distant legislatures, state and federal, and proclaimed as "law".

This problem compounded through lobbying from international special interest groups, international corporations and national unions;

All which are
social "collectives" that through such lobbying attempt and succeed in dictating local policy and local interests.

This misuse of limited constitutional powers is a evident corruption of a clear intent by the Founders that describe the Constitution as having no additional new powers but only those to give effect to those defined delegated powers.

The 16th amendment was and is unconstitutional as it is not founded by any intent of the original compact.




Rights of the Colonists 1772 regarding rights possessed of "original compacts"

Samuel Adams: "When Men enter into Society, it is by voluntary consent; and they have a right to demandandinsist uponthe performance of such conditions, Andprevious limitations as form an equitable "original compact".--

Every natural Right not expressly given up or from the nature of a Social Compact"necessarily" ceded "remains".--".--"




See also the 17th Grievance of the Declaration of Independence where it defines one of the definitions of a tyrannical government, and reason for our separation of that government:




Grievance 17: "For imposing taxes on us without our consent";




Quite apparently, this was not a right to be "necessarily ceded".




Constitution: Article VI: All Debts contracted "and "Engagements" entered into (Oaths and Declarations), before the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United Sates under this Constitution as under the "Confederation". This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be "made" in >>>"pursuance thereof" ; and all Treaties (Oaths and Declarations) "made", or which shall be "made", under the ("limited")Authority of the United States, shall be supreme Law of the Land ...."




We have placed the word "limited" so that people will understand that the Constitution and the federal government is not a unlimited power but a very limited and delegated power.

If the states wished, they could remove the federal government in an instant.

... No?

Lets see the "intent" of the Framers of the constitution:




Virginia Ratifying Convention of the Constitution, MONDAY, June 16, 1788:

James Madison (in response to Patrick Henry's statement of caution):
 

"...An observation fell from a gentleman, on the same side with myself, which deserves to be attended to.

>>> If we be dissatisfied with the national government, if we "should choose to renounce {415} it", "this is an additional safeguard to our defence"."




This of course, should be balanced with the Declaration of Independence:




"Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object,
evinces a designto reduce them under absolute despotism, it is theirright, it istheir duty, tothrowoff such government and to provide new guards for their future security. Such has been the patient suffering of these colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former systems of government




But in no way does it remove the right or the duty.


Our government is not broken, it is simply being misused.



------------------



Regarding the Bill of Rights:




Virginia Ratifying Convention of the Constitution, MONDAY, June 16, 1788:


Patrick Henry:
"...And can any man think it troublesome, when we can, by a small interference, prevent our rights from being lost? If you will, like the Virginian government, give them knowledge of the extent of the rights retained by the people, and the powers of themselves, they will, if they be honest men, thank you for it. Will they not wish to go on sure grounds?
But if you leave them otherwise, they will not know how to proceed; and,being in a state of uncertainty, they (government) will "assume" rather than give up powers by IMPLICATION."


(APP Note: A issue exemplified of the federal government of today attempting to make a limited document into a living changing document causing much uncertainty and allowing for the government to assume powers it does not and can never have.)


Patrick Henry: "A bill of rightsmay be summed up in a few words. What do they tell us? That our rights are reserved. Why not say so?Is it because it will consume too much paper?Gentlemen's reasoning against a "bill of rights" does not satisfy me. Without saying which has the right side, it remains doubtful. A bill of rights is a favorite thing with the Virginians and the people of the other states likewise. It may be their prejudice, but the government ought to suit their geniuses; otherwise, its operation will be unhappy. A bill of rights, even if its necessity be doubtful, will "exclude the possibility" of dispute;and, with great submission,I think the best way is to >>>"have NO dispute".

In the present (1776-Confederacy) Constitution, they are restrained from issuing general warrants to search suspected places, or seize persons not named, without evidence of the commission of a fact,  There was certainly some celestial influence governing those who deliberated on that Constitution; for they have, with the most cautious and enlightened circumspection, guarded those indefeasible rights which ought ever to be held sacred! The officers of Congress may come upon you now (with the new Constitution being proposed),fortified with all the terrors of "paramount federal authority". Excisemen may come in multitudes; for the limitation of their numbers no man knows. They may,unless the general government be restrained by a bill of rights, or some similar restriction, go into your cellars and rooms, and search, ransack, and {449} measure, every thing you eat, drink, and wear>>>They (the federal government) "ought" to be"restrained" " Within proper bounds". "




Regarding Limited Powers of the Constitution and federal government:




Virginia Ratifying Convention of the Constitution, MONDAY, June 16, 1788:

Mr. Pendelton:
"... With respect to the necessity of the ten miles square being superseded by the subsequent clause,
which gives them power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any "department" or "officer" thereof,I understand that clause asnotgoing a "single step" beyond the delegated powers. What can it act upon?Some power given by this Constitution.If they should be about to pass a lawin consequence of this clause, they must pursue some of the delegated powers, but can by "no means" depart from them, or arrogate